Difference between revisions of "Ākhyāna"

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Ākhyāna literally means ‘narration from memory’.
 
Ākhyāna literally means ‘narration from memory’.
  
Ākhyānas are narratives recited from memory but having their basis in some historical incidents. Some commentators define ākhyāna as the description of incidents witnessed by the narrator and distinguish it from upākhyānas which are also such descriptions but not directly witnessed by the narrator. It is these ākhyānas which are mostly stories of kings or holy men that have formed the basis of ītihāsas (epics) and purāṇas (mythology). Ākhyānas are often found in Vedic literature, as stories narrated to kings during sacrifices.
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Ākhyānas are narratives recited from memory but having their basis in some historical incidents. Some commentators define ākhyāna as the description of incidents witnessed by the narrator and distinguish it from upākhyānas which are also such descriptions but not directly witnessed by the narrator. It is these ākhyānas which are mostly stories of kings or holy men that have formed the basis of ītihāsas (epics) and [[purāṇas]] (mythology). Ākhyānas are often found in Vedic literature, as stories narrated to kings during sacrifices.
  
  

Latest revision as of 13:34, 19 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Akhyana, AkhyAna, AAkhyaana


Ākhyāna literally means ‘narration from memory’.

Ākhyānas are narratives recited from memory but having their basis in some historical incidents. Some commentators define ākhyāna as the description of incidents witnessed by the narrator and distinguish it from upākhyānas which are also such descriptions but not directly witnessed by the narrator. It is these ākhyānas which are mostly stories of kings or holy men that have formed the basis of ītihāsas (epics) and purāṇas (mythology). Ākhyānas are often found in Vedic literature, as stories narrated to kings during sacrifices.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

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