Difference between revisions of "Ālasya"

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Ālasya literally means ‘lassitude’.
 
Ālasya literally means ‘lassitude’.
  
Ālasya or laziness is the worst enemy of man. Even material well-being is blocked by it. How can the lazy one hope for spiritual progress is a question. That is why Patañjali, the great teacher of Yoga, has listed it as an antarāya or obstacle in the path of yoga.<ref>Yogasutras 1.30</ref> Since it is caused by an excess of tamas (dark element among the guṇas), it is to be overcome by rajas (activity) and sattva (dynamic goodness).
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Ālasya or laziness is the worst enemy of man. Even material well-being is blocked by it. How can the lazy one hope for spiritual progress is [[a]] question. That is why Patañjali, the great teacher of [[Yoga]], has listed it as an antarāya or obstacle in the path of yoga.<ref>Yogasutras 1.30</ref> Since it is caused by an excess of tamas (dark element among the guṇas), it is to be overcome by rajas (activity) and sattva (dynamic goodness).
  
Suśruta, the great teacher of Ayurveda (medicine and surgery), considers ālasya as a condition which inclines a man more towards pleasure and less towards work even if capable of it.<ref>Suśruta Samhitā, Sārirasthāna, 4.51</ref>
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Suśruta, the great teacher of [[Ayurveda]] (medicine and surgery), considers ālasya as [[a]] condition which inclines a man more towards pleasure and less towards work even if capable of it.<ref>Suśruta Samhitā, Sārirasthāna, 4.51</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore
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[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]

Revision as of 06:25, 16 October 2014

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Alasya, Alasya, AAlasya


Ālasya literally means ‘lassitude’.

Ālasya or laziness is the worst enemy of man. Even material well-being is blocked by it. How can the lazy one hope for spiritual progress is a question. That is why Patañjali, the great teacher of Yoga, has listed it as an antarāya or obstacle in the path of yoga.[1] Since it is caused by an excess of tamas (dark element among the guṇas), it is to be overcome by rajas (activity) and sattva (dynamic goodness).

Suśruta, the great teacher of Ayurveda (medicine and surgery), considers ālasya as a condition which inclines a man more towards pleasure and less towards work even if capable of it.[2]

References

  1. Yogasutras 1.30
  2. Suśruta Samhitā, Sārirasthāna, 4.51
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore