Difference between revisions of "Āmantrana, nimantraṇa"

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Ā[[mantra]]ṇ[[a]], [[Nimantraṇa]] literally means ‘invitation’.
 
Ā[[mantra]]ṇ[[a]], [[Nimantraṇa]] literally means ‘invitation’.
  
Inviting [[brāhma]]ṇas for partaking the food during [[a]] śrāddha ceremony is an important part of that ritual. The [[dharma]]-śāstras prescribe elaborate rules with regard to the type of brāhmaṇas to be invited and also the mode of inviting them.
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Inviting [[brāhma]]ṇas for partaking the food during [[a]] [[Śrāddha|śrāddha]] ceremony is an important part of that ritual. The [[dharma]]-śāstras prescribe elaborate rules with regard to the type of [[brāhmaṇas]] to be invited and also the mode of inviting them.
  
 
The two words constantly used in this connection are ‘ā[[mantra]]ṇa’ and ‘nimantraṇa.’ Though they are often used synonymously, subtle distinctions are sometimes made. A ‘nimantraṇa’ is more or less compulsory to accept. If the invitee rejects it without proper grounds, he is said to incur sin. But ‘āmantraṇa’ does not imply compulsion. The invitee has much greater freedom to accept or reject it.
 
The two words constantly used in this connection are ‘ā[[mantra]]ṇa’ and ‘nimantraṇa.’ Though they are often used synonymously, subtle distinctions are sometimes made. A ‘nimantraṇa’ is more or less compulsory to accept. If the invitee rejects it without proper grounds, he is said to incur sin. But ‘āmantraṇa’ does not imply compulsion. The invitee has much greater freedom to accept or reject it.

Latest revision as of 13:41, 19 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Amantrana, nimantrana, Amantrana, nimantraNa, AAmantrana, nimantrana


Āmantraa, Nimantraṇa literally means ‘invitation’.

Inviting brāhmaṇas for partaking the food during a śrāddha ceremony is an important part of that ritual. The dharma-śāstras prescribe elaborate rules with regard to the type of brāhmaṇas to be invited and also the mode of inviting them.

The two words constantly used in this connection are ‘āmantraṇa’ and ‘nimantraṇa.’ Though they are often used synonymously, subtle distinctions are sometimes made. A ‘nimantraṇa’ is more or less compulsory to accept. If the invitee rejects it without proper grounds, he is said to incur sin. But ‘āmantraṇa’ does not imply compulsion. The invitee has much greater freedom to accept or reject it.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore