Difference between revisions of "Āvarana"

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It is derived from the root ‘vṛ’ with [[a]] prefix ‘ā,’ the word ‘āvaraṇa’ means anything which covers or surrounds. In the [[Advaita]] Vedānta it refers to the veiling power of māyā/avidyā.
 
It is derived from the root ‘vṛ’ with [[a]] prefix ‘ā,’ the word ‘āvaraṇa’ means anything which covers or surrounds. In the [[Advaita]] Vedānta it refers to the veiling power of māyā/avidyā.
  
In temple architecture, it refers to the enclosures or prākāras, surrounding the main shrine, wherein the āvaraṇ[[a]]- devatās (minor [[deities]], the attendants of the chief deity) are housed, and the utsavamurti (procession deity) and other paraphernalia.
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In temple architecture, it refers to the enclosures or prākāras, surrounding the main shrine, wherein the āvaraṇ[[a]]- [[devatās]] (minor [[deities]], the attendants of the chief deity) are housed, and the [[utsavamurti]] (procession deity) and other paraphernalia.
In śaivism the word is used for a protective covering, in the spiritual sense. There are eight such āvaraṇas.  
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In [[Śaivism|śaivism]] the word is used for a protective covering, in the spiritual sense. There are eight such āvaraṇas.  
  
  

Latest revision as of 14:06, 19 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Avarana, Avarana, AAvarana


Āvarana literally means ‘veil, cover’.

It is derived from the root ‘vṛ’ with a prefix ‘ā,’ the word ‘āvaraṇa’ means anything which covers or surrounds. In the Advaita Vedānta it refers to the veiling power of māyā/avidyā.

In temple architecture, it refers to the enclosures or prākāras, surrounding the main shrine, wherein the āvaraṇa- devatās (minor deities, the attendants of the chief deity) are housed, and the utsavamurti (procession deity) and other paraphernalia. In śaivism the word is used for a protective covering, in the spiritual sense. There are eight such āvaraṇas.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore