Difference between revisions of "Anitya"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  
 
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[[Category:Glossary]]<small>By Jit Majumdar</small>
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Time, space and causation are great destroyers. Everything in this created world comes under their sway and hence gets changed, modified, decayed and destroyed. All such objects are called anitya as opposed to nitya which is the eternal unchanging principle. Philosophical systems generally accept the [[Ātman|ātman]] and God as nitya and other things like the external objects or the body as anitya.
  
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==References==
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore
  
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[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]
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[[Category:Glossary]]
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Latest revision as of 13:09, 6 December 2015

By Swami Harshananda

  1. not eternal, not permanent
  2. temporary, transient.

Time, space and causation are great destroyers. Everything in this created world comes under their sway and hence gets changed, modified, decayed and destroyed. All such objects are called anitya as opposed to nitya which is the eternal unchanging principle. Philosophical systems generally accept the ātman and God as nitya and other things like the external objects or the body as anitya.

References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore