Difference between revisions of "Bṛhatī"

From Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia
m (added category for Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism)
m (Links to existing pages added by LinkTitles bot.)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  
* The Bṛhatī is [[a]] well-known [[chandas]] or meter of Vedic Samhitās. Out of 14 such Vedic meters, it occupies the 4th place. It has 4 pādas or quarters, with 9 letters in each pāda. According to the sage Śaunaka, as mentioned in his Chando’nu- kramani, there are 181 mantras in the Ṛgveda Samhitā composed in the Bṛhatī meter.
+
* The Bṛhatī is [[a]] well-known [[chandas]] or meter of Vedic Samhitās. Out of 14 such Vedic meters, it occupies the 4th place. It has 4 pādas or quarters, with 9 letters in each pāda. According to the sage Śaunaka, as mentioned in his Chando’nu- kramani, there are 181 mantras in the [[Ṛgveda]] Samhitā composed in the Bṛhatī meter.
  
* Bṛhatī is also the name of [[a]] well- known commentary by Prabhākara (8th century) on the Sābara-bhāsya. This commentary is a written by Sahara (57 B.C.) on the famous Mimāmsāsutras of Jaimini (200 B. C.).
+
* Bṛhatī is also the name of [[a]] well- known commentary by [[Prabhākara]] (8th century) on the Sābara-bhāsya. This commentary is a written by Sahara (57 B.C.) on the famous Mimāmsāsutras of [[Jaimini]] (200 B. C.).
  
  

Latest revision as of 22:39, 15 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Brhati, BRhatI, Brrihati


  • The Bṛhatī is a well-known chandas or meter of Vedic Samhitās. Out of 14 such Vedic meters, it occupies the 4th place. It has 4 pādas or quarters, with 9 letters in each pāda. According to the sage Śaunaka, as mentioned in his Chando’nu- kramani, there are 181 mantras in the Ṛgveda Samhitā composed in the Bṛhatī meter.
  • Bṛhatī is also the name of a well- known commentary by Prabhākara (8th century) on the Sābara-bhāsya. This commentary is a written by Sahara (57 B.C.) on the famous Mimāmsāsutras of Jaimini (200 B. C.).


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore