Difference between revisions of "Bhārati"

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Bhārati literally means ‘one who delights in light or knowledge’.
 
Bhārati literally means ‘one who delights in light or knowledge’.
  
* The Ṛgveda<ref>Ṛgveda 1.142.9</ref> mentions Bhāratī as one of the three goddesses (the other two being Ilā and Sarasvatī) who are requested to reside in the [[barhis]] or sacrificial grass.
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* The [[Ṛgveda]]<ref>[[Ṛgveda]] 1.142.9</ref> mentions [[Bhāratī]] as one of the three goddesses (the other two being [[Ilā]] and [[Sarasvatī]]) who are requested to reside in the [[barhis]] or sacrificial grass.
* In the later literature, Bhāratī has also been identified with Sarasvatī, the goddess of learning.  
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* In the later literature, [[Bhāratī]] has also been identified with [[Sarasvatī]], the goddess of learning.  
 
* According to some religious texts, Bhāratī is one of the two consorts of Gaṇapati, the other being Śrī.
 
* According to some religious texts, Bhāratī is one of the two consorts of Gaṇapati, the other being Śrī.
 
* ‘Bhāratī’ is also one of the ten titles assigned to the monks of the Daśanāmī Order created by Ś[[a]]ṅkara (A.D. 788-820).
 
* ‘Bhāratī’ is also one of the ten titles assigned to the monks of the Daśanāmī Order created by Ś[[a]]ṅkara (A.D. 788-820).

Latest revision as of 20:54, 15 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Bharati, BhArati, Bhaarati


Bhārati literally means ‘one who delights in light or knowledge’.

  • The Ṛgveda[1] mentions Bhāratī as one of the three goddesses (the other two being Ilā and Sarasvatī) who are requested to reside in the barhis or sacrificial grass.
  • In the later literature, Bhāratī has also been identified with Sarasvatī, the goddess of learning.
  • According to some religious texts, Bhāratī is one of the two consorts of Gaṇapati, the other being Śrī.
  • ‘Bhāratī’ is also one of the ten titles assigned to the monks of the Daśanāmī Order created by Śaṅkara (A.D. 788-820).

References

  1. Ṛgveda 1.142.9
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore