Difference between revisions of "Karmavipāka"

From Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia
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Karmavipāka literally means ‘fruition of karma’.
 
Karmavipāka literally means ‘fruition of karma’.
  
Karma theory is the extension of the proverb, ‘As you sow, so shall you reap!’ to the spiritual field. All the actions done by us have a twofold effect: that which is seen here and now; and, their future effect, depending upon whether they are puṇya (good) or pāpa (bad).
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Karma theory is the extension of the proverb, ‘As you sow, so shall you reap!’ to the spiritual field. All the actions done by us have a twofold effect:
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# That which is seen here and now.
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# Their future effect, depending upon whether they are puṇya<ref>Punya means good.</ref> or pāpa.<ref>Pāpa literally means bad.</ref>
  
 
The ripening of a part of the accumulated karma, to give its result is called ‘karmavipāka’.
 
The ripening of a part of the accumulated karma, to give its result is called ‘karmavipāka’.

Revision as of 14:24, 19 May 2015

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Karmavipaka, KarmavipAka, Karmavipaaka


Karmavipāka literally means ‘fruition of karma’.

Karma theory is the extension of the proverb, ‘As you sow, so shall you reap!’ to the spiritual field. All the actions done by us have a twofold effect:

  1. That which is seen here and now.
  2. Their future effect, depending upon whether they are puṇya[1] or pāpa.[2]

The ripening of a part of the accumulated karma, to give its result is called ‘karmavipāka’.

See also KARMA.


References

  1. Punya means good.
  2. Pāpa literally means bad.
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore