Laukikī

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By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Laukiki, LaukikI, Laukiki


laukikī

This is the fourth of the ṣaṭkarmas or the six purificatory exercises for

cleansing the body prescribed in the works on Haṭhayoga. It consists in moving the stomach and intestines with great force from one side to the other. It destroys all diseases and increases digestive power. (See Gheranda Sarhhitā 1.52.)


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

laukikī B18* This is the fourth of the ṣaṭkarmas or the six purificatory exercises for cleansing the body prescribed in the works on Haṭhayoga. It consists in moving the stomach and intestines with great force from one side to the other. It destroys all diseases and increases digestive power. (See Gheranda Samhitā 1.52.) laya (‘dissolution’) Derived from the root Tī’ (to dissolve, to disappear) the word ‘laya’ has been used in several senses. When it refers to the dissolution of the created world (for e.g., sṛṣṭi, sthiti and laya), the term ‘pralaya’ is more frequently used. (See PRALAYA for details.) In the works on yoga, it refers to the samādhi state wherein the mind is completely merged in the object of meditation. In Advaita Vedānta, it is considered as the first obstacle to the realisation of ātman, the others being vikṣepa (distrac¬tion), kaṣāya (failure to rest on the ātman due to attachments) and rasāsvāda (enjoying the taste of bliss in lower samādhi). Here, laya is the relapsing of the mind into sleep instead of meditating on the ātman. In music it refers to the maintenance of the speed with which a song is begun to be sung. layayoga (‘yoga of dissolution [of the mind in Brahman]’) Out of the several systems of yoga mentioned in the works on yoga, Layayoga also is one. Laya or dissolution of the individual consciousness is achieved when prakṛti (Mother Nature, same as the Kuṇḍalini)is taken up from the mulādhāracakra (the lowest plexus), step by step, right up to the sahasrāra (the ‘thousand-petalled lotus’) where it is merged in Puruṣa or Brahman. This is called ‘Layayoga’. According to some works on yoga like the Mandalabrāhmana Upanisad (5.1-5), Layayoga comprises nine steps: yama (restraint), niyama (culture), sthulakriyā (gross practices like the āsanas), sukṣma kriyā (subtle practices like prāṇāyāma), pratyāhāra (withdrawal of senses), dhāraṇā (fixed attention), dhyāna (medi¬tation), layakriyā (act of dissolution of the mind into Brahman) and samādhi or mahālaya (final dissolution resulting in the losing of one’s personality into that of Brahman). Mokṣa or liberation from transmigra- tory existence results from this.