Likhita

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By Swami Harshananda

Likhita

The dharmasutra work of Śaṅkha-Likhita is considered as very authoritative by the Vājasaneyins (followers of Sukla Yajurveda).

As per the story in the Mahābhārata 0Sāntiparva 23.18-43) Likhita once went to the hermitage of his elder brother Śaṅkha. Since Śaṅkha had gone out, Likhita had to wait until he returned. During this time he saw some nice fruits hanging from the trees in the garden, plucked a few and ate them. When Saṅkha returned and found what Likhita had done, he admonished him for this act of his, as theft and advised him to go to the king Sudyumna to receive appropriate punishment.

Though Sudyumna refused to give punishment—since Likhita was well-known as a sage of great rectitude—he was obliged to do so due to Likhita’s insistence. As per the law, both the hands of Likhita were cut off. When he arrived at Saṅkha’s hermitage again and reported to him of having received the punishment, Sañkha advised him to take bath in the nearby river. As soon as Likhita did so, he got back both his hands, due to the mysterious power exercised by Śaṅkha.

Likhita was the co-author of the dharmasutras, along with his brother Śaṅkha.

See ŚANKHA-LIKHITA-DHARMASUTRAS.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

Likhita The dharmasutra work of Śaṅkha- Likhita is considered as very authoritative by the Vājasaneyins (followers of Sukla Yajurveda). As per the story in the Mahābhārata 0Sāntiparva 23.18-43) Likhita once went to the hermitage of his elder brother Śaṅkha. Since Śaṅkha had gone out, Likhita had to wait until he returned. During this time he saw some nice fruits hanging from the trees in the garden, plucked a few and ate them. When Śaṅkha returned and found what Likhita had done, he admonished him for this act of his, as theft and advised him to go to the king Sudyumna to receive appropriate punishment. Though Sudyumna refused to give punishment—since Likhita was well- known as a sage of great rectitude—he was obliged to do so due to Likhita’s insistence. As per the law, both the hands of Likhita were cut off. When he arrived at Śaṅkha’s hermitage again and reported to him of having received the punishment, Sañkha advised him to take bath in the nearby river. As soon as Likhita did so, he got back both his hands, due to the mysterious power exercised by Śaṅkha. Likhita was the co-author of the dharmasutras, along with his brother Śaṅkha. See ŚANKHA-LIKHITA-DHARMASUTRAS. Hlāmurtis (‘aspects of [Śiva] in various forms’) Though Śiva, the third aspect of the Hindu Trinity, is worshipped only as a liṅga in the temples, twenty five forms of his are mentioned in the iconographical works. These forms (in human shapes) are established separately as decorative motifs, but, not worshipped. Some of them are: Anugrahamurtis (bestowing grace upon devotees like Nandi, Rāvaṇa or Caṇḍeśa); Antakamurtis (des-troying the demons like Gajāsura or Tripuras); Nṛttamurtis (in the dancing pose like tāṇḍava dance); Dakṣiṇāmṅrti (in the teaching pose of a guru); Haryardhamurti (combined form of Hari and Hara); Ardhanārīśvara (combined form of Śiva and Pārvatī); Bhikṣāṭana- murti (as a mendicant with a begging bowl) and so on.