Difference between revisions of "Nimitta"

From Hindupedia, the Hindu Encyclopedia
(Created page with "nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’) In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cau...")
 
(upload missing article from Harshananda)
Line 1: Line 1:
 +
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 +
 +
nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’)
 +
 +
In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cause, like clay for the pot) and ‘nimitta-kāraṇa’ (efficient cause, like the potter).
 +
 +
In the paranormal sciences, the two
 +
 +
words commonly used are ‘nimitta’ and ‘utpāta’. Though both indicate portents,
 +
 +
the latter stands for the evil ones whereas the former stands for both good and evil.
 +
 +
Throbbing of a person’s limbs like eye-brows or shoulders is an example usually cited.
 +
 +
nimittakārana (‘efficient cause’)
 +
 +
See NIMITTA.
 +
 +
 +
==References==
 +
{{reflist}}
 +
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
 +
== OLD CONTENT ==
 
nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’)
 
nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’)
 
In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cause, like clay for the pot) and ‘nimitta-kāraṇa’ (efficient cause, like the potter).
 
In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cause, like clay for the pot) and ‘nimitta-kāraṇa’ (efficient cause, like the potter).

Revision as of 09:19, 12 October 2014

By Swami Harshananda

nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’)

In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cause, like clay for the pot) and ‘nimitta-kāraṇa’ (efficient cause, like the potter).

In the paranormal sciences, the two

words commonly used are ‘nimitta’ and ‘utpāta’. Though both indicate portents,

the latter stands for the evil ones whereas the former stands for both good and evil.

Throbbing of a person’s limbs like eye-brows or shoulders is an example usually cited.

nimittakārana (‘efficient cause’)

See NIMITTA.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

nimitta (‘sign,’ ‘indication’) In the most general sense, it means a ‘cause’. In the Vedānta, the two terms normally used are ‘upādāna-kāraṇa’ (material cause, like clay for the pot) and ‘nimitta-kāraṇa’ (efficient cause, like the potter). In the paranormal sciences, the two words commonly used are ‘nimitta’ and ‘utpāta’. Though both indicate portents, the latter stands for the evil ones whereas the former stands for both good and evil. Throbbing of a person’s limbs like eye-brows or shoulders is an example usually cited.