Difference between revisions of "Nirṇayasāgara Press"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  
Nirṇayasāgara Press
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The printing of the scriptural works in the devanāgarī<ref>It means<ref>It is a Sanskrit script.</ref> script has always been an arduous task. When the printing presses were still in the early stages of development, much more care was needed to get the final product right. The Nirṇayasāgara Press is one printing press that deserved all praise.
  
The printing of the Hindu scriptural works in the devanāgarī (Sanskrit) script has always been an arduous task. When the printing presses were still in the early stages of development, much more care was needed to get the final product right.
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Started in A. D. 1864, it was situated at the following address: 26-28, Kolbhat Street, Bombay-2. It was one of the oldest commercial organisations of India, totally dedicated to the printing and publication of Sanskrit books. Apart from the well-known scriptures it had brought out the literary works also under the Kāvyamālā series.
 
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The Nirṇayasāgara Press is one printing press that deserved all praise.
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Started in A. D. 1864, it was situated at the following address: 26-28, Kolbhat Street, Bombay-2. It was one of the oldest commercial organisations of India, totally dedicated to the printing and publication of Sanskrit books. Apart from the well-known Hindu scriptures it had brought out the literary works also under the Kāvyamālā series.
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{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
 
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
== OLD CONTENT ==
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Nirṇayasāgara Press
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[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]
The printing of the Hindu scriptural works in the devanāgarī (Sanskrit) script has always been an arduous task. When the printing presses were still in the early stages of development, much more care was needed to get the final product right.
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The Nirṇayasāgara Press is one printing press that deserved all praise.
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Started in A. D. 1864, it was situated at the following address: 26-28, Kolbhat Street, Bombay-2. It was one of the oldest commercial organisations of India, totally dedicated to the printing and publication of Sanskrit books. Apart from the well- known Hindu scriptures it had brought out the literary works also under the Kāvyamālā series.
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auspicious times for various religious actions; śrāddha; rites for sarimyāsa.
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It is interesting to note that the work describes the procedure for satī or self- immolation of a widow who willingly undertakes it.
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It is equally interesting and educative to learn from Kamalākara’s another work, the Śudrakamalākara, the various facili¬ties and freedom given to the śudras, the last of the four varṇas or castes, regarding the worship of gods, observance of vratas or religious vows, allowing at least ten saṅiskāras (sacraments), the performance of the pañcamahāyajñas (five daily sacri¬fices) and many other socio-religious rites.
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Revision as of 15:12, 21 June 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Nirnayasagara Press, NirNayasAgara Press, Nirnayasaagara Press


The printing of the scriptural works in the devanāgarīCite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag script has always been an arduous task. When the printing presses were still in the early stages of development, much more care was needed to get the final product right. The Nirṇayasāgara Press is one printing press that deserved all praise.

Started in A. D. 1864, it was situated at the following address: 26-28, Kolbhat Street, Bombay-2. It was one of the oldest commercial organisations of India, totally dedicated to the printing and publication of Sanskrit books. Apart from the well-known scriptures it had brought out the literary works also under the Kāvyamālā series.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore