Nityalilā

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By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Nityalila, NityalilA, Nityalilaa


nityalilā (‘eternal sport’)

Vallabhācārya (A. D. 1473-1531) was an important teacher of the schools of Vedānta that teach, nay, lay great emphasis on bhakti or devotion to God, as the sole means of God-realisation and liberation.

He classifies the souls into three types: pravāha (those who are ever busy with worldly life); maryādā (those who follow the Vedic path strictly); and puṣṭi (those who worship the Lord out of pure love engendered only through divine grace).

God, out of his own free will, brings out a puṣṭi-type of soul out of himself, gives him a divine body like his own and sports with him (the puṣṭi-soul) for all timel This divine play is called ‘nityalilā’ wherein God remains subservient to that soul, giving him the joy of his own company. This joy has been technically called, ‘bhajanānanda’.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

nityalilā (‘eternal sport’) Vallabhācārya (A. D. 1473-1531) was an important teacher of the schools of Vedānta that teach, nay, lay great emphasis on bhakti or devotion to God, as the sole means of God-realisation and liberation. He classifies the souls into three types: pravāha (those who are ever busy with worldly life); maryādā (those who follow the Vedic path strictly); and puṣṭi (those who worship the Lord out of pure love engendered only through divine grace). God, out of his own free will, brings out a puṣṭi-type of soul out of himself, gives him a divine body like his own and sports with him (the puṣṭi-soul) for all timel This divine play is called ‘mtyalīlā’ wherein God remains subservient to that soul, giving him the joy of his own company. This joy has been technically called, ‘bhajanānanda’