Difference between revisions of "Niyama"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
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niyama (‘that which restrains’)
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In the most general sense, the word ‘niyama’ means a rule or discipline. This includes things that are ordained or prohibited, especially during the observance of vratas or religious vows.
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In the Yogasutras of Patañjali (200 B. C.) it forms the second of the eight steps of yoga and comprises these five disciplines: śauca (cleanliness), santoṣa (contentment), svādhyāya (study of scriptures), tapas (austerity) and īśvarapraṇi-dhāna (devotion to God and dedication of the fruits of work (vide 2.32).
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The Hathayogapradīpikā (1.17) gives a longer list of disciplines under niyama. They are: tapas (austerity), santoṣa (contentment), āstikya (faith in God), dāna (giving gifts, charity), īśvarapujana (worship of God), siddhānta-vākyaśravaṇa (listening to the statements of the scriptures),
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hrī (modesty), mati (discerning mind), japa (repetition of mantras) and huta (sacrifice, oblations in duly consecrated fire).
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In Sanskrit grammar it refers to a restricting rule as prevailing over a more general rule.
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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== OLD CONTENT ==
 
niyama (‘that which restrains’)
 
niyama (‘that which restrains’)
 
In the most general sense, the word ‘niyama’ means a rule or discipline. This includes things that are ordained or prohibited, especially during the obser¬vance of vratas or religious vows.
 
In the most general sense, the word ‘niyama’ means a rule or discipline. This includes things that are ordained or prohibited, especially during the obser¬vance of vratas or religious vows.

Revision as of 09:19, 12 October 2014

By Swami Harshananda

niyama (‘that which restrains’)

In the most general sense, the word ‘niyama’ means a rule or discipline. This includes things that are ordained or prohibited, especially during the observance of vratas or religious vows.

In the Yogasutras of Patañjali (200 B. C.) it forms the second of the eight steps of yoga and comprises these five disciplines: śauca (cleanliness), santoṣa (contentment), svādhyāya (study of scriptures), tapas (austerity) and īśvarapraṇi-dhāna (devotion to God and dedication of the fruits of work (vide 2.32).

The Hathayogapradīpikā (1.17) gives a longer list of disciplines under niyama. They are: tapas (austerity), santoṣa (contentment), āstikya (faith in God), dāna (giving gifts, charity), īśvarapujana (worship of God), siddhānta-vākyaśravaṇa (listening to the statements of the scriptures),

hrī (modesty), mati (discerning mind), japa (repetition of mantras) and huta (sacrifice, oblations in duly consecrated fire).

In Sanskrit grammar it refers to a restricting rule as prevailing over a more general rule.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

niyama (‘that which restrains’) In the most general sense, the word ‘niyama’ means a rule or discipline. This includes things that are ordained or prohibited, especially during the obser¬vance of vratas or religious vows. In the Yogasutras of Patañjali (200 B. C.) it forms the second of the eight steps of yoga and comprises these five disciplines: śauca (cleanliness), santoṣa (contentment), svādhyāya (study of scrip¬tures), tapas (austerity) and īśvarapraṇi- dhāna (devotion to God and dedication of the fruits of work (vide 2.32). The Hathayogapradīpikā (1.17) gives a longer list of disciplines under niyama. They are: tapas (austerity), santoṣa (con¬tentment), āstikya (faith in God), dāna (giving gifts, charity), īśvarapujana (wor¬ship of God), siddhānta-vākyaśravaṇa (lis¬tening to the statements of the scriptures), hrī (modesty), mati (discerning mind), japa (repetition of mantras) and huta (sacrifice, oblations in duly consecrated fire). In Sanskrit grammar it refers to a restricting rule as prevailing over a more general rule.