Difference between revisions of "Padmāvati"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
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Padmāvati
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Padmāvatī is one of the names of Lakṣmī, the divine consort of Viṣṇu/ Nārāyaṇa. Since she emerged from the kṣīrasamudra (See SAMUDRAMATHANA.) with padmas or lotus flowers in her hands, she was called ‘Padmāvatī’.
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According to the local legends of Tirumala/Tirupati—the famous place of Vaiṣṇava pilgrimage—Padmāvati was the daughter of one king Ākāśarāja and was married to Veṅkaṭeśvara (the central deity of Tirumala). Even today this marriage— known as ‘Padmāvatipariṇaya’ (or ‘kalyā-ṇotsava’)—is often ceremonially celebrated by the temple authorities as per the desire of the devotees.
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At Tirucānur, 3 kms. (2 miles) from the Tirupati railway station, there is a big temple of Padmāvatī who is known (in Tamil) as ‘Alarmelmañgai’.
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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== OLD CONTENT ==
 
Padmāvati
 
Padmāvati
 
Padmāvatī is one of the names of Lakṣmī, the divine consort of Viṣṇu/ Nārāyaṇa. Since she emerged from the kṣīrasamudra (See SAMUDRAMATHANA.) with padmas or lotus flowers in her hands, she was called ‘Padmāvatī’.
 
Padmāvatī is one of the names of Lakṣmī, the divine consort of Viṣṇu/ Nārāyaṇa. Since she emerged from the kṣīrasamudra (See SAMUDRAMATHANA.) with padmas or lotus flowers in her hands, she was called ‘Padmāvatī’.

Revision as of 09:19, 12 October 2014

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Padmavati, PadmAvati, Padmaavati


Padmāvati

Padmāvatī is one of the names of Lakṣmī, the divine consort of Viṣṇu/ Nārāyaṇa. Since she emerged from the kṣīrasamudra (See SAMUDRAMATHANA.) with padmas or lotus flowers in her hands, she was called ‘Padmāvatī’.

According to the local legends of Tirumala/Tirupati—the famous place of Vaiṣṇava pilgrimage—Padmāvati was the daughter of one king Ākāśarāja and was married to Veṅkaṭeśvara (the central deity of Tirumala). Even today this marriage— known as ‘Padmāvatipariṇaya’ (or ‘kalyā-ṇotsava’)—is often ceremonially celebrated by the temple authorities as per the desire of the devotees.

At Tirucānur, 3 kms. (2 miles) from the Tirupati railway station, there is a big temple of Padmāvatī who is known (in Tamil) as ‘Alarmelmañgai’.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

Padmāvati Padmāvatī is one of the names of Lakṣmī, the divine consort of Viṣṇu/ Nārāyaṇa. Since she emerged from the kṣīrasamudra (See SAMUDRAMATHANA.) with padmas or lotus flowers in her hands, she was called ‘Padmāvatī’.

File:Padmāvati.jpg

According to the local legends of Tirumala/Tirupati—the famous place of Vaiṣṇava pilgrimage—Padmāvati was the daughter of one king Ākāśarāja and was married to Veṅkaṭeśvara (the central deity of Tirumala). Even today this marriage— known as ‘Padmāvatipariṇaya’ (or ‘kalyā- ṇotsava’)—is often ceremonially celebrated by the temple authorities as per the desire of the devotees. At Tirucānur, 3 kms. (2 miles) from the Tirupati railway station, there is a big temple of Padmāvatī who is known (in Tamil) as ‘Alarmelmaṅgai’. Paila (‘descendant of the sage Pila’) The sage Kṛṣṇa Dvaipāyana has been credited with achieving the great task of collecting all the Vedic mantras extant during his time, editing them by dividing them into four books and teaching them to his four chief disciples. Hence he came to be known as Vedavyāsa or Vyāsa (vyas = to divide, to edit). These four books— known as the Rgveda, the Yajurveda, the Sāmaveda and the Atharvaveda—were taught respectively to the sages Paila, Vaiśampāyana, Jaimini and Sumantu. Thus Paila, a descendant of the ancient sage Pila, was the first disciple of Vedavyāsa through whom the Rgveda was propagated. Nothing more is known about him.