Difference between revisions of "Pratyāmnāya"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
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pratyāmnāya (‘restatement,’ ‘that which comes in its place’)
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This is a technical word used in two senses.
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In logic, it is used in the sense of re-asserting the pratijñā or the original statement when the same is doubted or objected to.
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In the dharmaśāstras it is used to indicate a substitute when the original rite cannot be done. For instance, when a particular expiation cannot be performed by the transgressor, another—a simpler or easier one—is prescribed. If the sinner is unable to donate a cow as expiation for a sin, he is permitted to pay some gold coins as prescribed. This is called pratyāmnāya.
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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== OLD CONTENT ==
 
pratyāmnāya (‘restatement,’ ‘that which comes in its place’)
 
pratyāmnāya (‘restatement,’ ‘that which comes in its place’)
 
This is a technical word used in two senses.
 
This is a technical word used in two senses.
 
In logic, it is used in the sense of re-asserting the pratijñā or the original statement when the same is doubted or objected to.
 
In logic, it is used in the sense of re-asserting the pratijñā or the original statement when the same is doubted or objected to.
 
In the dharmaśāstras it is used to indicate a substitute when the original rite cannot be done. For instance, when a particular expiation cannot be performed by the transgressor, another—a simpler or easier one—is prescribed. If the sinner is unable to donate a cow as expiation for a sin, he is permitted to pay some gold coins as prescribed. This is called pratyāmnāya.
 
In the dharmaśāstras it is used to indicate a substitute when the original rite cannot be done. For instance, when a particular expiation cannot be performed by the transgressor, another—a simpler or easier one—is prescribed. If the sinner is unable to donate a cow as expiation for a sin, he is permitted to pay some gold coins as prescribed. This is called pratyāmnāya.

Revision as of 09:20, 12 October 2014

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Pratyamnaya, PratyAmnAya, Pratyaamnaaya


pratyāmnāya (‘restatement,’ ‘that which comes in its place’)

This is a technical word used in two senses.

In logic, it is used in the sense of re-asserting the pratijñā or the original statement when the same is doubted or objected to.

In the dharmaśāstras it is used to indicate a substitute when the original rite cannot be done. For instance, when a particular expiation cannot be performed by the transgressor, another—a simpler or easier one—is prescribed. If the sinner is unable to donate a cow as expiation for a sin, he is permitted to pay some gold coins as prescribed. This is called pratyāmnāya.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

pratyāmnāya (‘restatement,’ ‘that which comes in its place’) This is a technical word used in two senses. In logic, it is used in the sense of re-asserting the pratijñā or the original statement when the same is doubted or objected to. In the dharmaśāstras it is used to indicate a substitute when the original rite cannot be done. For instance, when a particular expiation cannot be performed by the transgressor, another—a simpler or easier one—is prescribed. If the sinner is unable to donate a cow as expiation for a sin, he is permitted to pay some gold coins as prescribed. This is called pratyāmnāya.