Difference between revisions of "Syamantakamaṇi"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  
Satrājita was a Yādava chieftain. Through severe austerities he had appeased Surya.<ref>Surya means the Sun-god.</ref> Pleased with him, Surya had given him a special gem called Syamantakamaṇi which would yield 160 tolas<ref>160 tolas is equivalent to 34 kgs.</ref> of gold every day. Satrājit had strung it into a necklace which could be worn whenever one liked.
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Satrājita was a Yā[[dava]] chieftain. Through severe austerities he had appeased [[Surya]].<ref>[[Surya]] means the Sun-god.</ref> Pleased with him, Surya had given him a special gem called Syamantakamaṇi which would yield 160 tolas<ref>160 tolas is equivalent to 34 kgs.</ref> of gold every day. Satrājit had strung it into a necklace which could be worn whenever one liked.
  
Once Kṛṣna is said to have requested Satrājit to give it to him but Satrājit refused. One day, Prasena, brother of Satrājit, wearing this necklace, went out hunting. A lion killed him and was taking the necklace away when Jāmbavān<ref>Jāmbavān is the king of bears, of the Rāmāyaṇa fame.</ref> encountered it, killed it and took the necklace to give it to Jāmbavatī, his daughter. She tied it to the cradle of the baby in her house.
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Once Kṛṣna is said to have requested Satrājit to give it to him but Satrājit refused. One day, Prasena, brother of Satrājit, wearing this necklace, went out hunting. A lion killed him and was taking the necklace away when Jāmbavān<ref>Jāmbavān is the king of bears, of the Rāmāyaṇa fame.</ref> encountered it, killed it and took the necklace to give it to Jāmbavatī, his daughter. She tied it to the cradle of the baby in her [[house]].
  
 
When Satrājit heard that Prasena had been killed and that the necklace had been missing he suspected Kṛṣṇa of stealing it. Kṛṣṇa quickly searched for it, recovered it from Jambavan and restored it to Satrājit.
 
When Satrājit heard that Prasena had been killed and that the necklace had been missing he suspected Kṛṣṇa of stealing it. Kṛṣṇa quickly searched for it, recovered it from Jambavan and restored it to Satrājit.
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==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore
  
 
[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]
 
[[Category:Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism]]

Latest revision as of 21:10, 18 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Syamantakamani, SyamantakamaNi, Syamantakamani


Satrājita was a Yādava chieftain. Through severe austerities he had appeased Surya.[1] Pleased with him, Surya had given him a special gem called Syamantakamaṇi which would yield 160 tolas[2] of gold every day. Satrājit had strung it into a necklace which could be worn whenever one liked.

Once Kṛṣna is said to have requested Satrājit to give it to him but Satrājit refused. One day, Prasena, brother of Satrājit, wearing this necklace, went out hunting. A lion killed him and was taking the necklace away when Jāmbavān[3] encountered it, killed it and took the necklace to give it to Jāmbavatī, his daughter. She tied it to the cradle of the baby in her house.

When Satrājit heard that Prasena had been killed and that the necklace had been missing he suspected Kṛṣṇa of stealing it. Kṛṣṇa quickly searched for it, recovered it from Jambavan and restored it to Satrājit.


References

  1. Surya means the Sun-god.
  2. 160 tolas is equivalent to 34 kgs.
  3. Jāmbavān is the king of bears, of the Rāmāyaṇa fame.
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore