Talk:Sadāśiva

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By Swami Harshananda

Sadāśiva (‘the Ever Auspicious One’)

Sadāśiva is one of the aspects and names of god Śiva.

He is described as having five heads and ten arms, and is seated in baddha-padmāsana (bound lotus posture). The heads are adorned with matted hair. The ten hands hold śakti (spear with a triangular tip), triśula (trident), khaṭvāṅga (magic wand), abhayamudrā, varadamudrā (gestures of protection and boon-giving), serpent, snake, ḍamaru (hand-drum), nīlotpala (blue-lotus) and bījāpura (pomegranate fruit).

Alternately, he may be shown as having a single face with three eyes, adorned on the head by a crescent moon. His consort is Manonmani.

In another description he is pictured as saumya (pleasant and peaceful). He has

four arms, two carrying purṇāmṛta-kumbhas (pots filled with nectar) and the other two carrying one more pot and a rosary.

In Śaivasiddhānta (See ŚAIVISM.) Sadāśiva is the Supreme Godhead, but absolutely formless, all-pervading, extremely subtle and incomprehensible.

Sadāvrata (‘the religious vow [of giving food] always’)

Vratas or religious rites with certain vows attached to it, are a part of popular Hinduism. Sadāvrata—also called Annadānamāhātmya—is one of them.

Giving food to hungry persons is highly eulogised even in the Upaniṣads (vide Katha Upanisad 1.8; Taittiriya Upanisad 2.2).

There are no fixed days and times for this gift of food.

Interesting stories in the purāṇas describe the evil effects of not feeding hungry souls when they come to one’s house.

The free kitchens in places of pilgrimage are also called by this name.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

Sadāśiva (‘the Ever Auspicious One’) Sadāśiva is one of the aspects and names of god Śiva. He is described as having five heads and ten arms, and is seated in baddha- padmāsana (bound lotus posture). The heads are adorned with matted hair. The ten hands hold śakti (spear with a triangular tip), triśula (trident), khaṭvāṅga (magic wand), abhayamudrā, varadamudrā (gestures of protection and boon-giving), serpent, snake, ḍamaru (hand-drum), nīlotpala (blue-lotus) and bījāpura (pome¬granate fruit). Alternately, he may be shown as having a single face with three eyes, adorned on the head by a crescent moon. His consort is Manonmani. In another description he is pictured as saumya (pleasant and peaceful). He has four arms, two carrying purṇāmṛta- kumbhas (pots filled with nectar) and the other two carrying one more pot and a rosary. In Śaivasiddhānta (See ŚAIVISM.) Sadāśiva is the Supreme Godhead, but absolutely formless, all-pervading, ex¬tremely subtle and incomprehensible.