Difference between revisions of "Talk:Sambandhavārttika"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
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Sambandhavārttika (‘brief commentary on the relation’)
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Sureśvara (A. D. 800) was one of the four chief disciples of Sankara (A. D. 788-820). He has written two vārttikas or sub-commentaries on the bhāṣyas of Saṅkara on the Brhadāranyaka Upanisad and the Taittirlya Upanisad.
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The first one is one of the longest works (spread over 11,151 verses) in Indian philosophy. The introductory part of it consisting of 1135 verses is known as Sambandhavārttika. It tries to establish the sambandha or relation between the Karmakānda portion and the Jñānakānda portion of the Veda (which deal with rituals and knowledge respectively).
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The work is highly polemical.
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==References==
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{{reflist}}
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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== OLD CONTENT ==
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  

Revision as of 05:12, 15 November 2014

By Swami Harshananda

Sambandhavārttika (‘brief commentary on the relation’)

Sureśvara (A. D. 800) was one of the four chief disciples of Sankara (A. D. 788-820). He has written two vārttikas or sub-commentaries on the bhāṣyas of Saṅkara on the Brhadāranyaka Upanisad and the Taittirlya Upanisad.

The first one is one of the longest works (spread over 11,151 verses) in Indian philosophy. The introductory part of it consisting of 1135 verses is known as Sambandhavārttika. It tries to establish the sambandha or relation between the Karmakānda portion and the Jñānakānda portion of the Veda (which deal with rituals and knowledge respectively).

The work is highly polemical.


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT

By Swami Harshananda

Sambandhavārttika (‘brief commentary on the relation’)


References

  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore

OLD CONTENT