Difference between revisions of "Yājñavalkya Smṛti"

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<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
 
<small>By Swami Harshananda</small>
  
Yājñavalkya Smṛti is a well-known smṛti belonging to the classical dharmaśāstra literature. It is said to be a composition of the famous sage Yājñavalkya, the promulgator of the Śukla Yajurveda Samhitā. Its style and ideas seem to be close to this Veda. The present edition as available now was probably finalized by A. D. 700, though the original might be placed between 100 B.C. and A. D. 300.
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[[Yājñavalkya Smṛti]] is a well-known smṛti belonging to the classical dharmaśāstra literature. It is said to be a composition of the famous sage Yājñavalkya, the promulgator of the Śukla [[Yajurveda]] Samhitā. Its style and ideas seem to be close to this [[Veda]]. The present edition as available now was probably finalized by A. D. 700, though the original might be placed between 100 B.C. and A. D. 300.
  
 
==Content of Yājñavalkya Smṛti==
 
==Content of Yājñavalkya Smṛti==
It has 1010 verses in the classical anuṣṭubh meter. It has five standard commentaries by Aparārka,<ref>He lived in A. D. 1200.</ref> Mitramiśra,<ref>He lived in 17th century A. D.</ref> Sulapāṇi,<ref>He lived in circa A. D. 1400.</ref> Vijñāneśvara<ref>He lived in circa A. D. 1100.</ref> and Viśvarupa.<ref>He lived in A. D. 800.</ref> It appears like a beautiful summary of the Manusmṛti. Its contents are as follows:
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It has 1010 verses in the classical anuṣṭubh meter. It has five standard commentaries by [[Aparārka]],<ref>He lived in A. D. 1200.</ref> Mitramiśra,<ref>He lived in 17th century A. D.</ref> Sulapāṇi,<ref>He lived in circa A. D. 1400.</ref> Vijñāneśvara<ref>He lived in circa A. D. 1100.</ref> and [[Viśvarupa]].<ref>He lived in A. D. 800.</ref> It appears like a beautiful summary of the [[Manusmṛti]]. Its contents are as follows:
  
 
===First Kānda===
 
===First Kānda===
* Fourteen vidyās or sources of knowledge like the Vedas and Vedāñgas
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* Fourteen [[vidyās]] or sources of knowledge like the [[Vedas]] and Vedāñgas
* Expounders of dharma
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* Expounders of [[dharma]]
 
* Sixteen sanskāras
 
* Sixteen sanskāras
 
* Four āśramas
 
* Four āśramas
 
* Eight forms of marriage
 
* Eight forms of marriage
 
* Eating māsa or flesh
 
* Eating māsa or flesh
* Dāna or giving gifts
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* [[Dāna]] or giving gifts
* Śrāddha and its varieties
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* [[Śrāddha]] and its varieties
* Śāntis or propitiatory rites
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* [[Śāntis]] or propitiatory rites
 
* Navagrahas or nine planets
 
* Navagrahas or nine planets
* Rājadharma or duties of a king
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* [[Rājadharma]] or duties of a king
 
* Fate and human effort
 
* Fate and human effort
 
* Weights and measures
 
* Weights and measures
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===Third Kānda===
 
===Third Kānda===
* Cremation and burial
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* [[Cremation]] and burial
 
* After-death rites
 
* After-death rites
 
* Āpaddharma or rules of conduct in distress
 
* Āpaddharma or rules of conduct in distress
* Vānaprastha and sanyāsa
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* [[Vānaprastha]] and [[sanyāsa]]
 
* Human physiology
 
* Human physiology
* Ātmajñāna
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* [[Ātmajñāna]]
 
* Yogins  
 
* Yogins  
 
* Mokṣa<ref>Mokṣa means liberation.</ref>
 
* Mokṣa<ref>Mokṣa means liberation.</ref>
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==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore
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* The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram [[Krishna]] Math, Bangalore

Latest revision as of 12:48, 19 December 2016

By Swami Harshananda

Sometimes transliterated as: Yajnavalkya Smrti, YAjJavalkya SmRti, Yaajyavalkya Smrriti


Yājñavalkya Smṛti is a well-known smṛti belonging to the classical dharmaśāstra literature. It is said to be a composition of the famous sage Yājñavalkya, the promulgator of the Śukla Yajurveda Samhitā. Its style and ideas seem to be close to this Veda. The present edition as available now was probably finalized by A. D. 700, though the original might be placed between 100 B.C. and A. D. 300.

Content of Yājñavalkya Smṛti

It has 1010 verses in the classical anuṣṭubh meter. It has five standard commentaries by Aparārka,[1] Mitramiśra,[2] Sulapāṇi,[3] Vijñāneśvara[4] and Viśvarupa.[5] It appears like a beautiful summary of the Manusmṛti. Its contents are as follows:

First Kānda

  • Fourteen vidyās or sources of knowledge like the Vedas and Vedāñgas
  • Expounders of dharma
  • Sixteen sanskāras
  • Four āśramas
  • Eight forms of marriage
  • Eating māsa or flesh
  • Dāna or giving gifts
  • Śrāddha and its varieties
  • Śāntis or propitiatory rites
  • Navagrahas or nine planets
  • Rājadharma or duties of a king
  • Fate and human effort
  • Weights and measures

Second Kānda

  • Administration of justice
  • Debts
  • Interest and repayment
  • Partition of property
  • Boundary disputes
  • Sale of property
  • Gambling
  • Crimes and punishment

Third Kānda

  • Cremation and burial
  • After-death rites
  • Āpaddharma or rules of conduct in distress
  • Vānaprastha and sanyāsa
  • Human physiology
  • Ātmajñāna
  • Yogins
  • Mokṣa[6]
  • Hells
  • Sins and expiations
  • Yamas and niyamas
  • Eulogy studying this work

References

  1. He lived in A. D. 1200.
  2. He lived in 17th century A. D.
  3. He lived in circa A. D. 1400.
  4. He lived in circa A. D. 1100.
  5. He lived in A. D. 800.
  6. Mokṣa means liberation.
  • The Concise Encyclopedia of Hinduism, Swami Harshananda, Ram Krishna Math, Bangalore