Colonial Discourse and the Suffering of Indian American Children Book Cover.webp

In this book, we analyze the psycho-social consequences faced by Indian American children after exposure to the school textbook discourse on Hinduism and ancient India. We demonstrate expose the correspondence between textbooks and the colonial-racist discourse. This racist discourse produces the same psychological impacts on Indian American children that racism typically causes: shame, inferiority, embarrassment, identity confusion, assimilation, and a phenomenon akin to racelessness, where children dissociate from the traditions and culture of their ancestors.

This book is the result of four years of rigorous research and academic peer-review, reflecting our ongoing commitment at Hindupedia to challenge the representation of Hindu Dharma within academia.

Āyyāppān

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By Jit Majumdar


  1. o dear father
  2. o dear lord
  3. a male deity who is very prominent and popular in southern India, who is considered by devotees to be the offspring of Śiva and Vişņu’s female form of Mohinī, and believed to be combining in himself the powers of both the deities, and who was originally a historical personality, who was adopted as son by the King Rājasekhara of the Pandalam kingdom (the present day township in the Pathanamthitta District of the state of Kerala), when the king found him as a newborn infant in the wilderness on a hunting expedition.

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